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[This story occurs during the Rise of the Empire era]
Events that occur between 44 and 40 years before the Battle of Yavin.

[ The Evil Experiment ]

Paperback Youth Novel
Check availability & pricing at:

[amazon.com]

[amazon.co.uk]

The Evil Experiment
BOOK STORY
Jude Watson
Scholastic Books
Story published as:
Paperback Youth Novel (2001)

Rating:
If you have read this book, please rate it:
Reviews:
1 review [Average review score: 3 / 5]

Synopsis:
An evil scientist is imprisoning and torturing Jedi to find the secret behind the Force. She taps their emotions, monitors their actions, and then drains them of their blood.
Qui-Gon Jinn is now her captive.
Obi-Wan Kenobi is desperately searching for his Master. Meanwhile, Qui-Gon must match wits with one of the most dangerous enemies he has ever encountered. His survival depends on it.


Chronology:
This story occurs approximately 11 years before the events of The Phantom Menace (43 years before the Battle of Yavin).


Related Stories (in chronological order):



Reviews:
Review by Bones, UK, 2011:

"After the ending of The Deadly Hunter, I anticipated much from The Evil Experiment. Some of it I received, and some I didn’t. The book sees two parallel sets of experiences, as often happens when Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan are separated. It is the Qui-Gon half that is the most interesting in this particular offering. His treatment at the hands of the scientist is unpleasant, and the scientist herself is developed into quite a satisfyingly demented little villain. And unlike previously, when I felt very little in the way of literary tension, here there is much more owing to the fact that Qui-Gon in danger is more exciting than a bland bit character in danger.
"The Obi-Wan half of the book is slightly less absorbing, due to the rather formulaic nature of its development. As with The Deadly Hunter, there are sets of clues to be followed and unravelled in order to find the naughty people. Obi-Wan is credibly written as a Padawan who has grown significantly under Qui-Gon’s tutelage and now must go it alone, but is accompanied by Astri, who is still mildly irritating. But more than anything it is the repetitive nature that causes it to fall a little flat. Fortunately, we are treated to another cliff-hanger at the end (albeit a similar one to previously) which could bode very well for the next instalment.
"Some enjoyable character explorations, but there is a little too much “been there, done that” going on in parts for this to be anything other than average."

Rating: 3 / 5

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